Surfing With Breast Implants

Female surfing enthusiasts who contemplate getting breast implants often wonder about how the procedure will impact their future in the sport.

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Whether you’re a seasoned shredder or clucked barney, breast implants pose no problem as long as you adhere to a few simple guidelines.


Women who follow a sensible recovery regimen, rebuild their physical stamina and agility with smart exercise, and pay attention to surfing technique will be back on the water in as little as 8 weeks with no ill effects.

Here are some key points to keep in mind with regard to surfing after breast implant surgery:

Always follow your doctor’s advice if it differs from anything you read here, but the general rule is to allow at least 2 months for recovery time before heading back to the water on your surfboard.

You will likely be able to swim and exercise within about 6 weeks of surgery provided your doctor approves and you aren’t in too much pain during activity.

The recovery process for active women tends to be a boring waiting game that includes about 4 weeks of very little physical activity and chest pain that ranges from mild to very annoying.

Be sure to eat right and get plenty of rest during the initial 4 weeks after surgery. During the subsequent 2 weeks, you can very gently attempt arm and torso exercise as your pain level permits. Don’t do any strenuous workout sessions until about 6 weeks has passed.


Factors That May Affect Your Recovery

breast implant recovery information

Depending on the type of surgery you have, there might be more or less of a chance that the implant moves after it is placed. Saline and polyurethane implants are susceptible to this risk whether you surf or not, so keep an eye out for movement and tell your doctor about it if it occurs. Realize that most women don’t have a problem with movement as long as they follow their doctor’s recovery guidelines carefully.

Waiting and being careful will help you avoid ruptures, broken stitches, increased pain, and other complications. No, it’s “not brain surgery,” but you still need to be careful if you wish to return to the surfboard with no hassles.

If your implants are beneath the pectoral muscles, expect to face a bit longer recovery period and a slightly higher amount of soreness than with other implant methods.


Start With Light Exercises

Swimming and light calisthenics seem to be the exercises of choice for most women during the transition phase between months one and two of recovery.

Gain strength back by slowly upping your exercise routine after the sixth week and heading into the final part of the second month after recovery. Here you can add more calisthenics, perhaps some weight workouts, and torso-strengthening stretches.

During the third month after the procedure, you’ll be ready to get in the water and brush up on technique. Be sure to avoid applying pressure directly to your chest during paddling. Use the torso as much as possible and remember to flex that lower back for optimal bio-mechanics.


girl surfer

Choose the Right Bathing Suit

Buy a secure swimsuit or bikini top for surfing. There are plenty of snug-fitting swimsuits out there for female surfers who want to keep their breasts in place during active sessions on the water. This pertains not just to surfers but also joggers, competitive swimmers, and women who take part in various water sports.


Use Proper Surfing Technique

Good surfing technique is a top priority during your first few weeks back on the board. The final weeks of the third month are an important turning point after breast implant surgery. If you’ve done everything correctly, you should be able to return to your former surf routine without any problems.

Millions of women have safely returned to surfing after breast implant surgery. The bumper-sticker rule is this: follow medical advice, take time to recover fully, and build up your fitness slowly. Additionally, paying close attention to perfect paddle technique will pay handsome dividends for women who are dedicated surfing enthusiasts.